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‘New Energy, New Life’

Tomasini’s Enoteca will reopen for business tomorrow after closing briefly for renovations. Del Norte Triplicate / Bryant Anderson
Tomasini’s Enoteca will reopen for business tomorrow after closing briefly for renovations. Del Norte Triplicate / Bryant Anderson
Revamped Tomasini’s features larger music stage, an updated look and new menu items 

Business owners of downtown Crescent City’s favorite mishmash of bar, cafe, boutique and florist have decided that this 3rd Street building isn’t big enough for the two of them.

After sharing a space since opening in 2006, Tomasini’s Enoteca and the Enchanted Florist parted ways this week, allowing each business to expand and try some new things. 

“It’s a nice opportunity to bring new life into downtown,” said Sacha Tomasini, owner of Tomasini’s Enoteca, which installed a new, larger music stage this week while knocking down walls, repainting and otherwise overhauling the space. The new and improved Tomasini’s Enoteca is opening today with a “whole new, fresh look,” she said.

On Friday night, one of the bar’s most popular acts, Three for the Road, broke in the new stage during a re-opening party featuring samples of some of the bar’s new offerings: a meatball sandwich and barbecue chicken sliders.

Enchanted Florist did not move far away, taking its popular blend of flowers, apparel and accessories right across 3rd Street into the space formerly occupied by Six Degrees of Celebration. 

“It’s going to be bigger and better. We’re adding a few new things,” said Diana Tomasini, owner of Enchanted Florist. “Come and visit — you’ll be surprised.”

‘Trendy place to hang out’

 

The revamped Tomasini’s Enoteca is designed with a motif of “rustic chic with an industrial flare” according to Adam Rump, the bar and restaurant’s new general manager. Pipe lighting, a 1950s gold retro couch and antique photos from the area help fulfill the old-school style.

The bar’s newly renovated tabletops are adorned with black-and-white photos of signature events in Del Norte history like the 1964 tsunami, the 1964 Christmas flood and also a collection of old photos from unknown local origins.

Tomasini said she hopes to get a shuffleboard table and perhaps a comfy place to play cards with the expanded space.

“We’ve never had so much space in our life,” said Tomasini, who considers herself a “foodie” and leaves her home in Marin County to visit San Francisco restaurants 
frequently.  

Tomasini said she plans to continue to update and improve the food menu, responding to customers’ ideas and suggestions, and she also plans to bring back wine and beer tastings.

Sacha Tomasini, owner of Tomasini’s Enoteca, creates collages of black-and-white photos to be used on tables in the restaurant. Del Norte Triplicate / Bryant Anderson
Sacha Tomasini, owner of Tomasini’s Enoteca, creates collages of black-and-white photos to be used on tables in the restaurant. Del Norte Triplicate / Bryant Anderson

The building improvements will be paired with an upgrade to service, with Rump saying the goal is to bring “upbeat, positive energy” to the serving staff and “make sure customers look forward to coming back.”

The additional space and lack of the need to worry about watching over Enchanted Florist’s inventory in the middle of the bar may lead to later hours for the establishment, which has typically closed doors no later than 10 p.m.

“We’ve never had a venue where we could actually do music and stay open later. My mom’s boutique was right in the middle of our bar, so we didn’t want people staying later,” Tomasini said. “Now we can focus primarily on being a bar, restaurant and trendy place to hang out.”

Fort Dick Tavern inspiration

While Tomasini’s Enoteca is less than 9 years old, guests who take a seat at the redwood bar are bellying up to a historical piece of Del Norte County libation lore.

Adam Rump, the new general manager at Tomasini’s, says the new and improved restaurant will feature “upbeat, positive service.” Del Norte Triplicate / Bryant Anderson
Adam Rump, the new general manager at Tomasini’s, says the new and improved restaurant will feature “upbeat, positive service.” Del Norte Triplicate / Bryant Anderson
Andrew Tomasini, Sacha’s great-grandfather, housed the more than 100-year-old redwood bar in his establishment, the Fort Dick Tavern, for more than 50 years. The liquor license acquired by Andrew Tomasini immediately following the end of prohibition is considered to be the first liquor license issued in the state of California, Sacha said.

After Andrew Tomasini passed away in 1986, the old redwood bar “sat in his tavern collecting dust,” Sacha said. Diana Tomasini had the piece refinished initially and kept it in her floral shop until she was inspired by a vacation Sacha took with her husband to Italy in 2005.

“My husband and I went to Italy, and we were inspired by the Enotecas — small plates and wines. Not these huge, heavy dishes,” Sacha said, adding that she took the idea home and opened Tomasini’s Enoteca.

With this week’s expansion, the redwood bar and the establishment revolving around it will again enter a new phase of celebration. In the words of Sacha Tomasini: “We’re revamping it with new energy, new life.”

Reach Adam Spencer at This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it  

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