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Blankenship was a winner in three sports

It is the time of year when I have to stop and realize how blessed I have been to have had the privilege of being a Warrior player, coach and fan and getting to know and work with the hundreds of young people I have grown to love and respect.

It is always fun to look back at individuals or teams that have given me such great memories.

Colin Blankenship, class of ’85, is one of those special people. I had the privilege of being one of Colin’s football coaches while he was at Del Norte.

Colin was a true multi-sport athlete, playing football, basketball and tennis while a Warrior.

He started his football career as a freshman on the JV team, which had a 5-3 record. He showed that he was going to be a skilled player
both as a defensive back a nd a receiver. As a sophomore he continued football at the JV level and moved to varsity as a junior.
During his senior year he was selected to the Humboldt Del Norte League All-League Team.


Newfound ‘victories’ await you this season

The following was written by Father Adam Kotas of St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Crescent City. Other local clergy members are invited to email holiday messages to This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Having celebrated Thanksgiving, we are now hastily getting ready for another festivity: Christmas.

Both are occasions to be thankful, but are we really grateful? I am reminded of one Peanuts comic strip where Snoopy took one look at his dog food on Thanksgiving Day and said, “This isn’t fair. The rest of the world today is eating turkey with all the trimmings and all I get is dog food.”

So often we too fall into this same victim mentality just like Snoopy. But, just like Snoopy realized he is not a victim but rather victorious, we too, can come to that same conclusion in our life through an “aha moment” called grace.

You see as Snoopy stood there and stared at his dog food for a moment he comprehended finally the message of this sacred season during which we celebrate both Thanksgiving and Christmas, and so Snoopy in his newfound understanding through grace said: “I guess it could be worse. I could be a turkey.”

Many times we are just like Snoopy, complaining and ranting and raving about how bad our life is. We have a victim mentality. This holy and grace-filled season reminds us to stop complaining and to rid ourselves of our victim mentality.


Church Notebook: Local Christmas music slated at various venues

I just don’t understand it!

Shopping for Christmas (or just simply trying to pick up a few needed things) is difficult enough without having all these special days when the stores are crowded and people so focused on their own wants that they have no patience for others.

Before I needed a handicap parking space, I never noticed the cars parked in them that displayed neither plate nor placard indicating their legitimacy. Or the obviously healthy young woman who says laughingly to her friend, “It can’t be a problem, I’m only going to be a minute,” as she exits the car she has just parked in a handicap space. Or the folks, gathered in the middle of the aisle in the store deep in conversation who see you using the motorized shopping cart and act as if you aren’t even there. I suppose they think it’s no problem — after all, you are sitting!

Perhaps the pain is making me grumpier than usual. (I’ll be getting this hip replaced in a couple of weeks.)

But what about all those other folks — the ones whose needs for access are even greater than mine?

It’s usually in my New Year’s column that I address the need for more courtesy and understanding of others. A sort of resolution thing for the new year. But lately, in addition to my own hassles, I’ve heard so many others complaining about a lack of respect, both in the stores and on the road, that I decided perhaps before Christmas might be a better time to plead for us all to be more considerate.


Coastal Voices: Micks should fill out DA term

We sent this letter recently to the Del Norte County Board of Supervisors:

The District Attorney’s Office prosecutes the criminal cases in Del Norte County. We are responsible for upholding the law and maintaining order in our community. The four criminal prosecutors work under the leadership of the district attorney or acting district attorney to ensure that justice is done in every case.

It is a difficult task, considering the numerous criminal cases we file each year. Every case is unique. Many of the cases are complex. The criminal prosecutors need an intelligent, strong, and ethical leader who can establish teamwork, trust, and continuity in our office.

Ms. Katherine Micks has done an exceptional job facilitating all of that. Ms. Micks stepped into the role of acting district attorney after our office fell into disarray. She is an intelligent, strong, and ethical leader, who already had the trust of the office from her prior years of service here as the assistant district attorney. We, as the prosecutors, work well under her and fully support her.

She has established the teamwork and continuity that we need and also improved efficiency and morale.

Ms. Micks reorganized the office and also streamlined the prosecution process. She initiated team meetings with the prosecutors, investigators, and support staff. She also has an open door policy for the local law enforcement agencies to contact her about any cases.


Church Notebook: Church hosts early Thanksgiving dinner

Thanksgiving is almost here. Most likely your plans are made and you are preparing either to travel or entertain guests.

Those of my family who are here will be getting together, but it’s a small number compared to the total. There’s one change for me here — I have a new son-in-law. Out of the area, I have a new great-granddaughter.

At any rate, being a major holiday, we can expect visitors to our little city, in our stores and our churches, and we certainly want them to leave feeling good about us. Be sure to smile even if they are strangers — it makes a difference!

I was coming out of Safeway recently, tired, and my pain level with this hip was “way up there.” All I wanted was to get home and flop in my recliner for a while. A gentleman I did not know passed me, and as he was entering the store flashed me a beautiful smile — it could not relieve my pain, but it sure gave my attitude a big lift!

We’re going to be fairly busy from here on out, I think.

• Sunday the Redwoods Family Worship Center will be hosting a special Thanksgiving service at 10:30 a.m., followed with a free Thanksgiving dinner with all the trimmings. The church invites you to attend.

Sunday evening at 5 p.m., there will be a “Soup Surprise and Movie Night.” A beef broth soup is provided, and members are encouraged to bring their favorite ingredients to add to it making it a surprise. The movie will be a surprise as well. All are invited to come and celebrate the beginning of the holidays.


Coastal Voices: Don’t lose sight of what’s good in local health care

My family and I moved to Eureka in 2003, and I have been practicing radiology at Sutter Coast Hospital since 2005.

I am writing this because there is a lot being said about the problems in medicine, not just here in Crescent City, but all over the country. The reality is that the entire system of health-care delivery needs a major overhaul, and no one has a good solution right now. Talking about these issues is healthy. Dissent is healthy, too, because sometimes thinking outside the box will spur innovation.

However, I do not want the people of Del Norte to lose sight of all the good things we have here.

Often we do not appreciate what is right in our backyard. It is easy to forget how much better things are here than in the big cities. This is certainly true when it comes to medical care.  The proverbial grass isn’t always greener.

I have been working as a radiologist for over 20 years. Over that time, I have had the opportunity to work at major medical teaching centers, HMOs, and large-, medium- and small-sized hospitals. My first choice is Sutter Coast Hospital; both as the place I choose to work and as the place my family prefers to receive medical care.

The reason is simple. The patient comes first at Sutter Coast Hospital. The staff, the physicians, the nurses and technologists treat patients as they would treat family members. In my experience, that is rarely the case in larger hospitals where, more often than not, you are treated as a disease, not as a person — or as my wife described her experience at a prestigious university cancer center, being just another “number.”


Coastal Voices: Clark Wade

“If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people, under the pretense of taking care of them, they must become happy.”

— Thomas Jefferson

“Of all tyranny, the tyranny exercised for the good of the people is the most oppressive.”

C.S. Lewis

This is in response to Bret Raushenbush’s Oct. 24 letter, “Lies mask GOP’s selfish, extremist obstructionism.” He describes the Republicans as having nothing to offer but to “the fanatics in their base.”

Webster defines “fanatic” as “marked by intense uncritical devotion.” I say this instead: There is no more curious political devotee than the one who lends cover to this man no matter the scandals, the lies and the suffering.     


Del Norte Gardening: Before the big rains, clean up your garden

Greetings from the farm!  As the holiday season arrives, and most certainly the “wet and cold” season, we are scrambling to put things to rest.

Thankfully, a year like this provides us with a November that is suitable for cleaning up the gardens, ripping out exhausted plantings, planting cover crops and even planting garlic and strawberries.

It looks like some solid stretches of rain are not far off, so, if you haven’t already put things to rest, we advise you do so quickly. One of our most helpful tasks of the late fall is combing the property of all items that are likely to blow all over the place in a storm. The alternative can really be a mess, and we’ve found ourselves all kinds of reluctant to be tidying in the wind and rain.

So take advantage of what dry weather we’ve had and make a push to clean up your space. You won’t regret it in December.

In the garden, there is still plenty of time to plant garlic and strawberries, and this is the time of year we plant those crops. Rain and soil moisture are the biggest factors in planting right now, so if there’s a window, you might as well take it.


Church Notebook: End-times evangelist to speak at Redwoods Family Worship Center

All those beautiful leaves, almost gone!

There are a few bright bits of yellow still clinging to those maples, just not very many. Soon, all there’ll be are bare branches — but along with those, we know that come spring, the cycle will start all over again. And not just new green buds in the trees, but daffodils and tulips, crocuses and other spring flowers that brighten our days as the winter finally begins to lose its grip.

Are you ready for Thanksgiving? I kind of miss those days, many years ago, at my grandmother’s table. I didn’t have to travel to get there, because she raised my sister Mary and me.

And oh, those meals! I don’t do anything near what she did back then. Seems like today families are spread so much farther apart, and lives are so busy it just doesn’t happen so much any more. We settle for phone calls and emails to keep in touch and get to see the grandkids growing up via the Internet.

When I count the numbers of my own descendants, the number is rather shocking. Six kids, however, do translate to lots more grandchildren and great-grands to boot. I try to imagine them (and their spouses)  all at one table and then realize how big it would have to be!


Letters to the Editor Nov. 12, 2013

McClure not appointed to serve on hospital study committee

The Nov. 7 Triplicate printed a list of the 15 members of the Camden Study Steering Committee.

On this list was 2nd District Supervisor Martha McClure. The Del Norte County Board of Supervisors chose not to send a representative to the Camden Study. If Supervisor McClure participated on the study, she did so as an individual and not as a duly appointed representative of the Board of Supervisors.

Supervisor Roger Gitlin, Crescent City

Homeless basically told to wander off and die in woods

Five minutes is all I ask. I want you to think about what you would do if by no fault of your own you become homeless with little more than the clothes on your back.

You’re a good person that wants to be a productive member of our society and want your life back desperately. The only problem is everywhere you go people treat you like a leper, call you lazy and treat you like trash.

What a sad world we live in when we can’t reach out and at least try to help the good homeless people. Why do we let the bad homeless dictate how we treat them all? If we treat them all as unwanted or criminals, does that not promote even more lawlessness and discontent?

It just sickens me that they have basically been told to wander off and die in the woods because we don’t want them.

Robert Allen, Smith River


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