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Three games that stood the test of time

Every Warrior football season I really get excited. Watching the present Warrior teams play always bring back long ago memories of my senior year as a Warrior football player.

There were three games that always bring back cherished thoughts. We opened our season at Cave Junction on a Saturday afternoon. It was a beautiful warm sunny day and we won a hard-fought game against the Cougars.

After the game they invited us to meet them at a local residence for a watermelon feed, which was great. There was a whole pickup load of watermelons to eat.

During the feed I had the chance to meet and talk to the Cougars’ outstanding running back, a young man named Ron Mauer. After graduation Ron went on to Southern Oregon College and I went on to Humboldt so we met again in my first year as a Lumberjack.

After that we both ended up in the Army and while I was in basic training I found that Ron was playing football for Fort Ord and was backup running back behind the great Ollie Matson.

After getting out of the service and returning to Humboldt I was in my last season as a Lumberjack and we were playing Southern Oregon. It was the one game while I was there that I got to be captain. When we went to the center of the field for the coin toss, guess who was the Southern Oregon captain: Ron Mauer.

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House Calls: Infection prevention and you

House Calls runs monthly. Today’s column is written by Deanna Russell, ICU supervisor and “Infection Preventionist” at Sutter Coast Hospital.

October is “National Infection Prevention” month and the kickoff for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Flu Vaccination season (October 2013–March 2014).

It is a perfect time to learn techniques to help you stay healthy at home, in a health-care setting, local schools and everywhere. 

These healthy prevention tips come from the National Association for Professionals in Infection Control & Epidemiology (APIC) http://consumers.site.apic.org/infection-prevention-in/everywhere-else/. 

Staying healthy at home

Don’t bring infections home to your family. Follow these steps to ensure you create and maintain a healthy and infection-free environment:

• Wash or sanitize your hands after you come home from public places. Wash hands before preparing food, before eating, between handling uncooked fruit and vegetables and raw meats, and after toilet use.

• Use safe-cooking practices. Foodborne illnesses frequently arise from poor food preparation and dining habits.

 

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Church Notebook: ‘Outreach in Park’ donations sought

Seventh-day Adventist Church putting on vegetarian cooking class

Ghosts and goblins, black cats and bats — we have no difficulty in recognizing the next “holiday” on the calendar.

But this is one fraught with controversy, because some churches put thumbs down on this one, while others have parties to keep the kids off the streets.

Whatever your view on this one, it’s sure to be challenged in the next couple of weeks.

We do celebrate that day at my house, but for a different reason — it’s my birthday.

It’s another of those times, however, that we need to be more cautious driving, and to keep our ears tuned for trouble.

Kids are excited and running from house to house to collect treats. They don’t look where they are going, and oftentimes those cute costumes they’re wearing obscure their vision — so it’s up to us to keep them safe.

The other negative aspect, sadly, is that these days predators are a concern, and events like we see on Halloween can make youngsters more vulnerable. Even if we don’t personally have kids out there making the rounds, other people do, and I think we should all want to keep them safe.

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Pages of History: Still raided, but where are culprits?

From the pages of the Crescent City American, October 1928.

Mystery surrounds the capture of a still on French Hill last Wednesday when W. C. Smith, L. R. Black, P. A. Brunk, Claude Willis and W. H. Taylor swooped down on the big manufacturing plant and brought it to Crescent City together with two prisoners.

The still contained three parts, making an aggregate capacity of around 900 to 1,000 gallons. Where the mystery part of the subject comes in is in the fact that there were two men brought in with the still yet the two men are not in jail nor is there any record in the Justice of the Peace’s Office.

Officers of the county freely admit that there was a still found and that arrests were made, yet there are no prisoners and no one has given bail. The justice of the peace states that no one has been brought to his court. 

Gold nugget found

Dan London, who owns a fine mining claim on Myrtle Creek, about 10 miles from this city, picked up a gold nugget on his claim last week that weighted out to $67. Mr. London also had several smaller nuggets, the aggregate find running well over the $80 mark. 

This property has been mined ever since the early 1850s, and there never having been a period of more than a year or two that the property has not been worked with good results. 

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E & P: A new appreciation for DNHS coaches

Today’s the first day on the job for the Triplicate’s new sports editor, Michael Zogg, who just arrived from Iowa.

That’s good news for readers who follow the Warriors and have perhaps noticed that the coverage has been a bit spare in the past month as various news staffers have filled in here and there. Three different people have covered football games, for example. Fortunately, whatever the sport, the words have still been accompanied by Bryant Anderson’s fine photos when Del Norte plays at home.

I’ve been part of the makeshift arrangement, and one thing I’ll take from it is a stronger appreciation of the dedicated coaches who lead our young athletes. I’ve interviewed several of them by phone after a contest, and whether they were celebrating victory or looking for the positives in a defeat, their knowledge of the sport and their empathy for their players was obvious.

We’re lucky to have them, and these conversations have reinforced my belief that the athletic opportunities afforded to our kids — from youth sports to high school varsity competition — are an important part of what makes this a good place to live.

Have fun with them, Michael.

Covering the prison

Once again, reporters came from far and wide to tour Pelican Bay State Prison last week in the wake of a hunger strike protesting the indeterminate terms many inmates serve in Security Housing Units.

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Letters to the Editor Oct. 10, 2013

Del Norte is better off without Alexander as DA

This unsolicited letter is in response to Veronica Candelaria’s Oct. 8 letter, “The D.A.’s Office is failing while Alexander is absent.”

I have personal experience with the likes of former district attorneys Bill Cornell, Mike Riese and Bob Drossel.

I’ve also spent more than three years litigating criminal conduct opposite Katie Micks as the acting D.A. This, during the haze of Riese’s last three years of his second term, or in the current absence of Alexander. All I can say after living through Cornell and Riese is, thank God we now have someone who understands there are 52 (at most) felony trial days in a year, and about 400 felony cases (down from Alexander’s irrational 1,000 per year). There are 2,200 or more misdemeanor cases put in the system each year, with 24 trial days.

Ms. Micks processes the cases along as well as can be expected, especially since the state will not create another judgeship in this town, despite meeting the state’s own criteria for such an appointment.

Alexander is the type of person to set another up and have them besmirched for his own career benefit. I know — I am his victim.

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Letters to the Editor Oct. 8, 2013

Stand up for our children and challenge bullying

I am writing as an outraged parent of three elementary school-aged children. The bullying, and vicious attacks on our students is still up and rising, despite what our area schools tell us, and I have seen people on various bullying sites talking about how their children are being bullied or have been beat up before, during, or after school.

All I can say to those parents is shame on you. Most of you have not gone past the police, or the principals of these area schools, to protect your own children. If the principals won’t help, go to the superintendent, and if he won’t help go to the state.

We have to start standing up for our children. Too many children are going into depression about their situations at school, that leads to, in their minds, no other alternative but to commit suicide, or develop some sort of other coping mechanism.

Pulling them out of school should not be the answer. Everyone deserves the “school experience” that we had growing up. Friends, dances and just general hanging out with your friends on the playground. It is a surreal experience that no one should miss.

We as parents are obligated to protect our children from the cold, and sometimes lonely, confines of bullying at our schools. For if we do not stand up for our children, who will?

Shawna Fairgood, Crescent City

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Coastal Voices: Crowded classes 1 sign we are failing in schools

I need to respond to the Sept. 28 article, “Classes crowded at DNHS.” As a retired teacher of that school, I can attest to this.

“Normal” or “good” is not above 30 or 40 students per class. Multiply this by five classes a day, and that’s 150 to 200 students every day. The Harvard School of Education stated years ago that for effective learning, class size should not be above 20 students.

Where do students go? They drop out! We graduate about half of entering freshmen, but, “We don’t have a ‘drop-out’ problem.”

When I first started teaching at the high school, about 27 years ago, my Spanish classes had about 26 students. My sophomore English classes only had 20, because the state had found that if students remained in school past the 10th grade, they normally graduated, so the state subsidized the classes.

About seven to eight years ago, I taught Independent Study and needed to refresh Algebra. The class I audited was so large that I could not see all the screen or board. I was frustrated and dropped out.

Before I retired, I had wall to wall students; not having room for enough desks, I added chairs to my seating plan. I would assign these to students I thought were emotionally strong and give them extra credit.

With 200, or more, students a day, how can their needs be met? How much attention can they get? How much time can teachers spend on their work?

The ratio previously agreed to by the union, was not an ideal, but an attempt to accommodate  necessity,  but it seems there is no end with the district. How sad it is we spend about $5,000 a year per student to educate here, but the state will spend $58,000 per   year to keep a person in prison.

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Open house for retiring teacher

The leaves on the maple trees in front of my house are starting to turn. There are several yellow ones now and before long there’ll be a lot more colors.

I love that aspect of the maples, but I hate seeing them bare in the winter. I hope the winter flies by because I’m not crazy about the cold weather.

But changes are the cycles of life, and before we know it, there will be little green buds on those branches and it will start all over again.

• Cycles of life change us, too, and are happening to a friend of mine at Grace Lutheran Church.

I first met Jane Goss several years ago when a group of folks from the various churches got together and did a benefit concert for Community Assistance Network, back when I was serving on the board there.

Beside being a very important teaching part of the school at Grace, Jane always helps out at the fair every year, taking in the baked and handcrafted items that are entered. It is always her pleasant smile that makes standing in line awaiting your turn worth the wait.

Jane is retiring after 25 years of classroom teaching, and I’m sure the kids will certainly miss her.

They won’t lose her completely, though, because she’ll still be there in an administrative position.

Today from 1 to 5 p.m., there will be an open house at the church. Guests will be encouraged to decorate a page in the memory book for her. Best wishes, Jane!

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Letters to the Editor Oct. 5, 2013

Numerous benefits of term limits for rancheria

Smith River Rancheria members have made tremendous progress to amend the tribe’s constitution to include Tribal Council term limits!

The For Your Knowledge (FYK) Committee has collected over 208 voter signatures on the initiative! We could not have accomplished this feat without the support of our tribal membership and we thank each and every one of you who felt so inclined to sign.

Once the voter signatures have been verified by the Election Board, the Tribal Council must call a special election on the initiative within 90 days. We are proud of our tribal voters that have continued their support for us to exercise our tribal sovereign rights.

We are on the verge of making effective and positive changes within our tribal governmental structure. Term limits are a good thing. Term limits will give all tribal members that aspire to become Tribal Council members an opportunity to participate in tribal leadership by providing fresh ideas as well as offering training to next generations to effectively operate fiscally sound governmental programs and projects to further our culture, language and heritage.

 There is a presumption that when council members know there is a six-year time frame to hold office they will work more efficiently and be more responsive to the needs of the general membership.

It is a known fact that effective leadership can be overwhelming. But there will be seasoned leadership available to pass on the baton since the seven-member council rotates out in staggered terms of office.

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