>Crescent City California News, Sports, & Weather | The Triplicate

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

Home arrow Opinion

Opinion


A rich find of ore along the Klamath

From the pages of the Crescent City American, October 1927.

Two Klamath men in Monday from the lower Klamath River section, says the Yreka Journal, had specimens of ore running $25,000 to a ton. These men, yet in their early 30s, came here about a year ago from the south and hearing about the good mines on the Klamath, determined to prospect. After considerable testing, they got a better bargain then they had ever dreamed.

Running a tunnel was successfully undertaken. They took a square foot of soil and rock, crushed and washed, and when they took it to the bank they were given a $250 check in exchange. 

These miners are reticent about giving out their names to the public, or giving out a great deal of information regarding their rich find. It is better than Weepah and is not a pocket find but a defined ledge, richer the deeper they go, they stated when in.

“We have made many assays and have in so many ways tested out the ledge for a long distance that we are now confident of what we have,” the men said. Then one of them produced a piece of the rich ore, more gold than rock.

“It’s just a little piece we broke off, and there is plenty more where that came from, and just as rich,” one said.

If the ledge is all that the specimen would indicate and if it runs for miles it ought to be a mighty big thing for the Klamath River country. Here’s hoping it is the bonanza it seems!

Read more...
 

Coastal Voices: Even in DN, don't take water for granted

“Whisky is for drinking; water is for fighting over.”

-— Quote attributed to Mark Twain

Lets just forget the possibility of a water rate increase for a minute and take the time to reflect on what water really means to all of us.

Once the importance of water is honestly assessed, we’ll be more equipped to objectively address the rates necessary to deliver the water to our homes and businesses.

We all know from basic science classes that our bodies are actually about 97 percent water! Water is a basic building block of life. Without drinking water none of us survive very long. The majority of the world’s population lives near or depends upon freshwater environments.

My brother recently retired from a career working with the World Health Organization to improve the public health of people living in developing countries. He does not hesitate to volunteer that the biggest threat to the populations of those countries is simply the lack of clean drinking water.

We drink, bathe, cook, clean, flush and play in and around water. Our crops and animals of all kinds need and consume water. We depend on water to put out fires in our forests and buildings. Water runs all manner of machinery and provides power to our industrialized world.

Here in California it is not unusual to hear about “water wars” between special interest groups, and between populations in Northern and Southern California. Dams and reservoirs are constructed, and complex, expensive delivery systems developed.

Read more...
 

Letters to the Editor Oct. 3, 2013

Fire fee protesters now have a voice

I have a few questions concerning the fire fee/tax.

Did you, the readers, pay your fee under protest? I hope you were able to get a petition for redetermination, filled it out and mailed it to be received within the time frame we were allowed by the state. 

When I got this notice to pay this fee last year — which caught me off guard — I called the State Board of Equalization. They were prepared for calls about this fee, as I was told to call Cal Fire and they gave me their phone number. I was also told that they just mail these notices and have no authority to make any judgments on my complaints and that I must file a complaint in the order of the petition for redetermination to Cal Fire. 

I phoned Cal Fire and was told the same thing. So I paid my fee/tax and put “paid under protest” on it, filled out the petition and mailed it. I only had five days to get it to Cal Fire and I acted very fast. It made it in the time frame and was not late.

Sometime later, I received a reply from Cal Fire. It was of no surprise to me that my petition and letter were denied. Cal Fire told me they had no authority in making decisions, they were just the agency that receives the money. Were you told the same as me?

I then mailed copies of all of this to all of our senators, our representatives, AARP and the Howard Jarvis Tax Payers Association (HJTA). I received a form-letter type of response from them, stating that the senators and representatives handle the federal issues for the state and this was a state issue. AARP was similar, only they are working on Medicare issues only and Social Security. 

Read more...
 

Letters to the Editor Oct. 1, 2013

Water is not the only rate or tax hike hitting us soon

I have to agree with the Sept. 26 Coastal Voices piece by Katherine Kelly, “Poor residents can’t pay more for water,” about the many low-income people in our community.

What wasn’t mentioned is the garbage rate hike, along with some sewer rate increases coming in the future, and a higher property tax for homeowners. Plus winter is coming and heating bills are going to go up.

People are being slammed from every angle. Separately, they don’t sound so bad, but adding them together spells disaster for so many people.

Even people who don’t live in poverty are living paycheck to paycheck and struggling to make ends meet. With all that’s being thrown at them, they could be part of that low-income group.

Is this what our city wants? To make us all poor?

Marsinah Murakami, Crescent City

New bicycle law could tie up traffic for miles

The Associated Press article, “Cyclists will get a 3-foot buffer under new law,” Sept. 28, has a statement that is not included in the lengthy description I got when researching the law on Google.

The article says regarding the proposal, “It states that if drivers cannot leave 3 feet of space, they must slow down and pass only when it would not endanger the cyclist’s safety.”

Read more...
 

Coastal Voices: This isn’t necessarily just a ‘crackpot’ idea

What does it take for an idea to go from “crackpot” to “worthy of consideration” to “the time has come” to “acceptance?”

I imagine our ancestors asked that question as they contemplated the “crackpot” idea of organizing 13 British colonies so that they could consider the outlandish idea of breaking away from the British yoke of oppression.

 They had legitimate reasons that they enumerated in the Declaration of Independence. They were willing to risk their lives, fortunes and sacred honor for a cause.

Today we live under an oppressive state government that only listens to the citizens living in large metropolitan areas like San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego. 

Our forebears fought the British because those colonists had no representation before the British crown. Is that any different than a state  imposing a tax that only applies to those living in rural areas and exempts cities?

The fire tax is a case in point where only those living in rural areas pay this $150 tax every year even though they are protected by their own local fire departments, to whom they also pay a tax.

Read more...
 

Letters to the Editor Sept. 28, 2013

Right to bear arms older than recorded history

Just a note to add to Gerry Dooley’s amusement (“Second Amendment doesn’t fit our times,” Sept. 21). The right of people to defend themselves was not invented by the writers of our Constitution.

It is a basic natural human right (some would say God-given) that has existed from before the advent of recorded history.

Tyrants, of course, do not respect that right because they know a defenseless population is easy to control. (Remember how Hitler managed to kill 6 million people?) 

Gerry says he is amused at the  efforts of us “right-wingers” to preserve that right. I am confused by the “left-wingers’” efforts to destroy it.

Refusing the right of honest citizens  to have guns will not prevent gun violence. In fact, an armed citizenry can often prevent violence. The bad guys are going to have and use guns no matter how many laws are passed. Making us honest law-abiding citizens defenseless will not prevent that.

Clif Shepard, Crescent City

 

Coastal Voices: Dealing with health care reform puzzle

We are just days away from the Affordable Care Act taking a major step forward as individuals and families begin to seize newly available opportunities to enroll in health care coverage.

All the pieces of the puzzle have to fit together. We won’t know how well all the technology and procedures will work together until after Tuesday, when enrollment commences.  

Undoubtedly, there will be problems — some with easy fixes and some that are more difficult to overcome — to address. Please know that our county agency and staff are doing everything in our control to bring health care coverage and the expansion to our residents.

For many in our community, it is the county where the rubber meets the road in health care reform.  Del Norte County Department of Health and Human Services is where many people will turn to understand the available health care coverage options either through the expansion of MediCal, or through the state insurance exchange, known as Covered California, which will offer income-based federal subsidies.

For Del Norte County, state projections indicate an additional 2,000 individuals will be eligible for MediCal and another 3,000 for the state insurance exchange. 

Read more...
 

Protest aside, what about our water?

It’s not an election year, but there is a door-to-door campaign unfolding nevertheless on the streets of Crescent City.

Both inside and outside the city limits, users of the city water system are being asked to sign letters protesting plans for a rate increase. If enough such letters are collected by Nov. 4, the proposal is quashed.

The natural inclination, of course, is to oppose anything that adds to your monthly expenses, especially if it seems to provide no additional services. The opponents of the rate increase are banking on this simplistic response. They say the good folks of Crescent City can’t afford to pay more. Period. End of story.

After all, when the budget’s tight, long-term maintenance gets deferred, right?

The problem with that line of thinking is that, while it may be prudent to postpone a new coat of paint on the house, it’s irresponsible not to maintain a public system that delivers fresh, clean, downright good-tasting water to your tap, your neighbors’ taps, the whole community’s taps. And once that system falls into disrepair, it’s a lot more complicated to fix it than to finally get around to that paint job.

Another problem with the just-say-no campaign is it ignores the fact that city officials have already deferred taking care of the water system’s finances to the point of irresponsibility.

The water system is aging. An elevated storage tank needs to be made more earthquake-resistant. And the water fund has been running a deficit that the city has been covering with reserves that are now depleted.

Read more...
 

Joe Gutierrez, class of 1981, was hoops star

In the fall of 1980 when my dream came true and I was able to return home and go to work at Del Norte High coaching football, there was a very talented young athlete wearing the blue and gold.

Joe Gutierrez, a 1981 Warrior graduate, was that athlete. Warrior fans may most remember Joe for his successes on the basketball court, which were many.

He played football during his junior and senior years under head coach Jerry Smith, and was an outstanding player both offensively and defensively. He was about 6-foot-4 with great hands and excellent speed, and these talents earned him all-league as a senior.

Joe started his Del Norte High School basketball career on the Warrior freshman team, where he led the team to a 15-4 record. He demonstrated early that he was a player that could put points on the board.

Read more...
 

Church Notebook: Church offers ‘Around the World’ class

When I got home from Bible study Thursday night, I made a disheartening discovery. I had forgotten to turn on the porch light before I left.

But the not thinking about it wasn’t the problem. The whole thing of it was, once again, how time has flown — that we have arrived at that point in the year when turning that light on is a necessity in order to arrive safely at the front door.

Before we know it, most of our days will be wet and windy again. At least the rose bushes and other flowering things will have a never-ending source of water that doesn’t require hauling out the garden hose!

I’m about to embark on a repeat of four years ago — the time I grew my jalapenos on the kitchen counter all winter.

Four years ago, I had four mild-variety jalapenos growing in a big pot on the back porch. I like the flavor of those peppers, but the regular variety make my mouth sore. So the mild ones seemed like a good thing to try.

They were growing beautifully, about 24 inches tall. One morning I went out to water them, and found them completely denuded of leaves. The slugs had had a feast. I watered anyway, hoping they’d come back.

Come back they did —unfortunately, for a repeat slug feast. Well, maybe they’d come back again. Water and a liberal application of slug pellets did the trick. Come back? They did so with a vengeance. At 30 inches, and just loaded with leaves and blossoms, I observed them with smug satisfaction. I was going to get some peppers after all. Really?

Read more...
 
<< Start < Previous page 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Next page > End >>

Triplicate front page

Get home delivery of the Triplicate for only $7.94 a month. After filling out one simple and secure online form you could be on your way to learning more about your city, state and world than you ever have before.
subscribe


Del Norte Triplicate:

312 H Street
P.O. Box 277
Crescent City, CA 95531

(707) 464-2141
webmaster@triplicate.com

Follow The Triplicate headlines on Follow The Triplicate headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2014 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use