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E & P: Thanks for the tributes to our WWII veterans

Kudos to the organizers of Del Norte’s Veterans Day activities for recognizing the pressing need to show appreciation to our World War II service members while we still have them around.

And while organizers stopped at naming five WWII vets as parade grand marshals, hopefully the message came through to all of our oldest veterans: Monday was about honoring U.S. military personnel in general, but this one was especially for those of you who fought in the ’40s.

I was pleased to see Frank McNamara among those grand marshals. He served at Okinawa — scene of the bloodiest of the island-hopping invasions that helped bring an end to the war against Japan. Back home, he became a veteran of a different sort, narrowly escaping the two biggest surges of the ’64 tsunami, one of which rose to mid-torso at the downtown paint store he managed, and the other of which chased him up L Street toward higher ground.

Now 92, Frank is a survivor, and Crescent City is the better for it.

Another nice touch by the organizers was adding a sixth parade grand marshal, Sua Phia Lo, a captain in the Hmong Army that fought Communist forces in the Vietnam era. He cut a striking figure as the commander of a guerrilla unit in the 1966 photo on Saturday’s Northcoast Life page. And his inclusion was an appropriate gesture of appreciation to Del Norte’s Hmong community, the eldest of which migrated to America after Laos fell to the Communists in the ’70s.

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Letters to the Editor Nov. 12, 2013

McClure not appointed to serve on hospital study committee

The Nov. 7 Triplicate printed a list of the 15 members of the Camden Study Steering Committee.

On this list was 2nd District Supervisor Martha McClure. The Del Norte County Board of Supervisors chose not to send a representative to the Camden Study. If Supervisor McClure participated on the study, she did so as an individual and not as a duly appointed representative of the Board of Supervisors.

Supervisor Roger Gitlin, Crescent City

Homeless basically told to wander off and die in woods

Five minutes is all I ask. I want you to think about what you would do if by no fault of your own you become homeless with little more than the clothes on your back.

You’re a good person that wants to be a productive member of our society and want your life back desperately. The only problem is everywhere you go people treat you like a leper, call you lazy and treat you like trash.

What a sad world we live in when we can’t reach out and at least try to help the good homeless people. Why do we let the bad homeless dictate how we treat them all? If we treat them all as unwanted or criminals, does that not promote even more lawlessness and discontent?

It just sickens me that they have basically been told to wander off and die in the woods because we don’t want them.

Robert Allen, Smith River

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Coastal Voices: There should be no hurry regarding hospital's next move

According to the chairman of the local Sutter Coast Hospital Board, it may vote on whether to downsize the hospital to a Critical Access facility, and to “regionalize” the hospital, which will dissolve themselves as the governing body, and transfer hospital ownership to Sutter Health’s West Bay Region in San Francisco, before the end of the year.

What’s the hurry? 

Two years ago, the Del Norte Healthcare District filed suit to slow down the regionalization process, which Sutter Health had initiated without informing our community.

It has been wrongly stated several times and again recently in a Coastal Voices piece by a local physician that Sutter Health owns Sutter Coast Hospital. When Sutter Health and the Del Norte County Local Hospital District negotiated a contract to build a new hospital  in 1985, it was agreed that Sutter Health would manage the hospital for an annual fee, the profits that Sutter Coast Hospital generated from its local patients paid for the facility and Sutter Health did very well managing the facility over the years.

It was also agreed that Sutter Coast would be operated as a locally owned entity, with a local Board.  

If ownership is transferred it will be to the Sutter Health subsidiary The West Bay Region.

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Letters to the Editor Nov. 9, 2013

Play about community evocative, worth seeing

I urge you not to miss Lighthouse Repertory Theatre’s “This is Crescent City.” We went last night and today I am still feeling the emotions evoked by this incredible musical.

It tells the story of us, of our town, our neighbors. What makes us not just the last town on the continent, or the first, but what builds us as community ... the human side of us.

I knew these stories intellectually, but it took seeing these performances to truly bring these lives into my heart. There weren’t many dry eyes last night. I never cry, ever, and I was sobbing last night. I am still feeling the effects today.

I want to stand on the S curves with signs urging everyone not to miss this home-grown story of our home.

Catherine O. Despres, Cresent City

Don’t let S curve veteran monument dream die

It must be over five years now since the city, through Police Chief Douglas Plack, approached the VFW about erecting a veterans monument at the “S” curve. There were committees formed and untold meetings — does it sound familiar so far? — with questionable progress.

I’m going to pat myself on the back here as I was the one who first gave $2,500 to kick-start the project. My intent was to get things started instead of just talking and planning.

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Warriors were looking spiffy back in 1950

For a long time when Warrior football players got ready to play a game they put on the same khaki pants that were worn every day for practice and a red and white wool jersey that was really uncomfortable. It was the same home or away.

When the 1949 season started, we had fancy new red and white uniforms. They consisted of white pants and red jerseys with white shoulders and sleeves. The helmets were still the white leather ones that were made before World War II.

The new Warrior coach, Chuck DeAutremont, had raised the money for these uniforms to help raise pride in Warrior football. Little did we know that we would only get to wear these uniforms for one season.

During the spring the school changed our colors from red and white to the blue and gold we have now.

Chuck went to work again to raise funds for new blue and gold uniforms. The boxing smokers were started and proved to be great money-makers.

The Warriors had two local professional boxers to thank for making these events successful. Dale and Sandy Sanderson, local Native Americans who fought professionally, came forward and helped organize these events.

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Church Notebook: Methodist Church sets the dates for its annual Holiday Bazaar

I’ve been writing this column for over 10 years now. But, could I write anything longer?

For the past few years I’ve had an idea for a book about Mary Magdalene. Lately, it’s become more than an idea. And, no, if I do, it won’t be anything like that other book out there — the one that made her out to be Jesus’ wife.

So, we’ll see. If I can get beyond a couple chapters, perhaps ...

But away from ideas of fiction and on to the real stuff for the next week or so. There are some good things coming up. With the holidays approaching, it’s time for those holiday bazaars, with their interesting sale items and delicious edible offerings.

• We’ll start the week off Sunday with an inspiring journey into the past at the Crescent City United Methodist Church. During pioneer days, the gospel was spread via camp meeting revivals. In many places, there were no established churches, and circuit riders traveled about carrying God’s word and mountain gospel music. That music isn’t heard many places anymore — but it is on occasion, here at the Methodist Church.

And it will be Sunday! Once again, the Jefferson State Boondock Band will be a lively addition to the Sunday morning service. The music will start at 10:15 a.m., and the regular worship service at 10:30. If you’ve never experienced this, it’s worth going! I’ve heard them, and they are absolutely delightful.

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Cannery idea considered for the local area

From the pages of the Crescent City American, November 1927.

As we were driving out the Elk Valley Road Sunday, we chanced to see Joe Christensen pruning dahlias in the front yard of a farm house below the road. We stopped the car and enquired what mission brought him in that part of the woods, and his reply was that he owned the ranch and was living there. He told us that he had bought the place, which consists of 50 acres, from Glenn Robinson the forepart of September.

Mr. Christensen stated among other things that he intended putting in three acres of strawberries in the spring and would also go into the vegetable raising business with a view to starting a cannery sometime in the future. This is something that is needed here, he said, and he is of the belief that a vegetable and berry cannery can be operated on a paying basis. 

Van’s Auto Camp sold

A deal was closed here this week whereby Mr. and Mrs. John B. Endert become the owners of Van’s Auto Camp, which was built in the spring of last year by J.M. Van Cleave, and under his operation since that time.

This camp is one of the finest on the coast and contains 24 cabins. There are 30 buildings in all and it is understood that Mr. and Mrs. Endert plan some extensive improvements after they take over the business on Monday, which will include a store at the road where groceries and lunches will be served to the tourist trade.

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Letters to the Editor Nov. 7, 2013

Citizens must signal disapproval of new law

When I first heard about the new California “transgender” law allowing mixed-sex use of school bathrooms, I viewed it as just another obscene joke from Los Angeles or San Francisco. Now I have learned that this institutionalized perversion will actually be implemented in Del Norte beginning Jan. 1.

I am not a native Californian, thank God, so perhaps I am not passive and indoctrinated enough to accept this in my adopted county without expressing my objections.

I would not think of advocating armed rebellion, of course, but I do hope at least a few parents will pull their children out of our failed public schools, and perhaps a mass refusal to pay the property taxes due next month would help to call attention to the urgent need to separate ourselves from Southern California and establish a new state of our own here.

John Cupp, Smith River

'Up our way' farther than many Californians think

We’ve discussed that Northern vs. Central California thing down here off and on. I’ve always related the story of (who knows how many) people I’ve bumped into from out of the area. When I tell them I’m from Eureka, the usual response is something along the line of, “That’s up by San Francisco, isn’t it?”

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Letters to the Editor Nov. 5, 2013

Farm bill threatens poor families, could cost gov't

I am writing you with concerns about the farm bill going under review. A lot of people may not realize this, but the farm bill addresses stricter eligibility requirements to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known as CalFresh is California — also known as food stamps.

I read an article from the New York Times and CNBC about the budget cuts the bill suggests. Due to my professional experience with SNAP benefits I believe the program should have stricter eligibility requirements, but not necessarily the budget cuts that are being suggested.

Stricter eligibility requirements would hopefully, in time, reduce the program payout amounts as everyone knows about the economic hardships at this time. The New York Times reported that the bill suggests putting a time frame of three months on the program for each client.

I believe there are clients out there that need the benefits more than three months so putting a time frame on the program is not realistic or beneficial to the general population.

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Waterman could have been a star DN athlete

Editor’s note: Due to space constraints, the Warrior Memories column originally scheduled for last Saturday appears today.
Another column will be printed this coming Saturday.

Today I’m continuing my occasional look back at female athletes who demonstrated their ability before the state finally recognized that girls deserved the same types of interscholastic activities as boys had been offered for years.

When you consider that boys’ competition goes clear back to the 1920s or earlier and girls’ competition was not recognized by the state until the 1970s, you realize how unfair it was for a long, long time.

I am sure that 1949 graduate Helen Waterman would be an outstanding athlete in today’s type of competition. I can remember watching Helen participate in lunchtime competition between physical education classes.

During her sophomore year she was on the fourth period PE championship basketball team and the fourth period volleyball team that finished second. She had earned her 100 points for GAA early and by her junior year had the 600 points necessary to become a member of GAC, the girls athletic club and received her block “D” letter.

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