>Crescent City California News, Sports, & Weather | The Triplicate

News Classifieds Web
web powered by Web Search Powered by Google

Home arrow Opinion

Opinion


Letters to the Editor July 29, 2014

Unbelievable that letter writers fail to take issue with Finigan

Anti-prayer in the public square, that is the drumbeat from the secular zealots. While the points raised by the recent writers of letters to the editor on the subject may have validity  and be deserving of debate they logically need to be held in abeyance while the issue of agendizing topics for public input is resolved. It should be noted that one writer applauds Chairman Finigan’s refusal to place the item of prayer before board meetings. He applauds it as a victory for freedom … in the real world it is a victory for atheism and socialism, both of which are diametrically opposed to freedom. A large number of recent letters to the editor blithely ignore the simple core principle, viz, a decision as to what is allowed on the agenda to be discussed  by a singular authority, the Chairman of the Board of Supervisors. It strikes this writer as pathetic that writers of letters to the Triplicate do not have a problem with a single head of the County Board having the say so as to what is decided  in a public forum. One such  writer singles out Supervisor Gitlin as the problem on the board.


Letters to the editor published July 26, 2014

 

Benefits of recycling lost on Waste Board members

 

Two members of our Solid Waste Authority Board here in Del Norte County, Michael Sullivan and Roger Gitlin, have characterized recycling as “extracurricular stuff” and “bells and whistles” and a third member, Mary Wilson, has agreed. Accordingly, and against the urging of a score or more of ratepayers appearing before the board, they have determined to impair our recycling program “to save money.” They could hardly be more mistaken. The truth is that recycling is not only imperative, it is saving ratepayers more money every year, as recycling increases and recycled material handlers absorb that reusable waste instead of having it hauled off at considerable expense to be buried in Oregon. 


Coastal Voices: Hospital’s plans ‘bad for us’

Never underestimate the difficulty of changing false beliefs by facts — Henry Rosovsky

I am writing in response to a recent editorial by Mr. Scott Feller (“Judge hospital facts for yourself,” July 3), Sutter Health’s latest appointee to the Board of Directors of Sutter Coast Hospital.

The title of Mr. Feller’s opinion piece poses a dilemma — how can anyone judge the facts when Sutter Health won’t release the facts? Despite formal requests by our elected officials, Sutter refuses to release meeting minutes and financial documents necessary to discern the suitability of Sutter’s plans for our community. Sutter frequently releases their paid advertisements and editorials by individuals connected with Sutter, but nothing of substance.


Letters to the Editor July 24, 2014

Downsizing Sutter is not an appropriate use of tax funds

As a former hospital administrator in the Good Samaritan system and a former hospital vice president at Marian Medical Center, I have been following this community’s conflict with Sutter Health with great interest. As a retiree to this community, I also have great interest in the future of the hospital, including whether or not Sutter is able to implement their plan to downsize the hospital in order to qualify for higher Medicare payments under the federally funded Critical Access program. 


Letters to the Editor July 22, 2014

Road improvements should be spread around

It must be nice to have an asphalt street, which was in good condition, extended wider and repaved completely, while the rest of us on dirt roads are driving through big potholes and knocking our front ends on our cars out of alignment.

I have called the road superintendent twice and have asked one of his road managers to return my calls. I’m still waiting. 


Did You Know: The rock or the hard place

Under the heading “be careful what you wish for” comes the unintended consequences of prison realignment. This is where the governor, in order to comply with a federal mandate to reduce the state prison population, signed state legislation whereby low-level state inmates would be transferred to local county jails. 

Unfortunately, this transfer to county jails was not without controversy. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that those transferred prisoners must receive the “reasonable accommodations” specified in the Americans with Disabilities Act. What this actually means is the state prisoners housed in local jails must receive the same level of care and privileges that they would receive in a state prison.


Letters to the Editor July 19, 2014

Uncontrolled borders leave country a mess

John Kerry says that Iraq is a complete mess because they can’t control their borders.

I completely agree. What country would be stupid enough to let people come in who are undocumented and unaccounted for? What a bunch of bozos who run that government in Iraq.


Pages of History: Sheriff seeks info about naked man

From the pages of the Del Norte Triplicate, July 1952:

Sheriff C.W. Glover has in his custody a pile of worn clothes found near Hiouchi Bridge, and some puzzling leads that have deepened the mystery.

The clothes were found Friday afternoon by Officer Hubert Dunn, CHP. They were piled neatly with the socks stuffed into the boots.

Two motorists driving Highway 199 Thursday night have reported seeing a naked man on the highway trying to get a ride. The first driver reported seeing him about a half mile from the bridge, heading toward Crescent City. The second saw him about 1 mile from the bridge. A third car reported seeing a man, either naked or in white clothes, diving off the roadway. A thorough search has failed to reveal any trace of the man.


California Focus: Early prison releases a political hazard, too

From early in his career, Gov. Jerry Brown has had a proclivity for dismissing problems with wisecracks or aphorisms. As early as 1975, in the first term of his first go-‘round as California’s top official, he mocked university professors’ pleas for pay raises by saying they didn’t need more money but could make do with “psychic rewards.”

He’s done the same thing lately as companies like Toyota and Occidental Petroleum announced they were moving headquarters and thousands of jobs out of state, noting that those firms and their jobs are just a tiny fraction of the California economy. True, but the moves are very consequential for the employees involved and everyone they do business with.


Letters to the Editor July 17, 2014

Second chance to stop another rate increase

The City Council passed an ordinance that increased sewer rates effective July 2.

Is there something that can be done to reverse that sewer rate hike? Yes, there is.


<< Start < Previous page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next page > End >>

Triplicate front page

Get home delivery of the Triplicate for only $7.94 a month. After filling out one simple and secure online form you could be on your way to learning more about your city, state and world than you ever have before.
subscribe


Del Norte Triplicate:

312 H Street
P.O. Box 277
Crescent City, CA 95531

(707) 464-2141
webmaster@triplicate.com

Follow The Triplicate headlines on Follow The Triplicate headlines on Twitter

© Copyright 2001 - 2014 Western Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. By Using this site you agree to our Terms of Use