Del Norte Gardening: Early planting may be a bust, but don’t give up

Submitted

Well, it looks like this is another spring in Del Norte County where planting your garden is going to be a real challenge.

We create a planting schedule sometime in the winter and do our best to make it happen once the soil dries.

The thing is, sometimes the brief window of dry soil does not correlate with your ability to get out in the garden. Or, even more discouraging, your space has never dried up to begin with.

It may seem like it is just too late for the garden this year. Do not fret! And, definitely, do not give up. You have not missed your opportunity.

We may have missed our opportunity to have an early harvest from the

garden, but may I remind you, it is the late summer and fall where we

see some of our best weather.

That being said, I'll let you in on a little secret. Almost,

everything we have planted at Ocean Air Farms (to date) is doing quite

poorly.

Last fall, we added lime and amended most of our fields. We grew

bigger cover crops than ever before and our soil prep wasn't too far

off.

So, I blame weather for all of these struggling plantings. Are we

going to give up? No! Is everything going according to plan? No, not

this time. What we are going to do is keep planting and do our very best

to work around the unpredictable weather.

There have been a number of seasons similar to this year, and the

same thing has happened each time. The first planting has been terrible,

but the second planting of things has done great!

The gamble comes with the crops that are planted once a year. For

example, say you have planted all your potato seed in early May, then it

rains most of the month. You are left with rotted seed and your wasted

time.

I know, it's frustrating! Sometimes, I get really frustrated, as my

friends, family and farm crew can attest. I feel you must have some

amount of passion for the garden to be fulfilled, if not, you give up.

If you decide to give up entirely, we will be at all the Farmer's

Markets in Crescent City and Brookings. You can see what we have been

able to grow and harvest, despite the "weird" weather.

I am happy to share every technique we have used to grow fruits and

vegetables.

Now, for those of you who have a strong will, my simple piece of

advice here, is to keep planting.

If you have planted out every square foot of your garden, well, you

put all your eggs in one basket and that hardly ever gives you a long

harvest season. Remember, to provide a lengthy harvest, many crops need

to be planted often.

For example, we plant broccoli, lettuce, radish and spinach every two

weeks. Squash, cucumber and greens we plant two or three times each

season. This provides us with a long harvest window and lots of food on a

more realistic schedule to eat, preserve, sell or give to the

neighbors.

If you have found yourself frustrated with the late rains, focus on

the second and third plantings. The Saturday Market at the fairgrounds

begins June 11 and the Wednesday Downtown Market begins June 15. We will

be there to talk gardening and food.

Del Norte Gardening runs the first Thursday of every month. Paul

Madeira and Julie Jo Ayer Williams own Ocean Air Farms in Fort Dick.

Have a question or suggestion? Email it to oceanairfarms@gmail.com and

it may be addressed in a future column.

13994780
The Del Norte Triplicate
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