Coastal Voices: Lessons from son’s ordeal on motorcycle

Submitted

My son Daniel was recently involved in a very serious motorcycle accident. It was "man versus Hwy. 199 and the guard rail."

It takes only one split second on that curvy road to have the turn overtake you. Before long he was propelled headfirst into the guard rail post, his helmet flew off his head and slid down the road along with his motorcycle, but where was my son? He was evidently propelled into the air over the guard rail, flying 15 feet before hitting a tree and dropping to the ground. His buddies pulled him back to the road and called 911.

The EMT team and ER doctors at Sutter Coast were great. When I called

after getting the message about the accident, they said he was

"critical." When you hear the word "critical," as it applies to your

child or anyone else you love, your brain and body seem to go on auto

pilot, as mine did as I processed what I might find when I got to the

hospital.

What I found was my big 6-foot-tall boy lying flat, wrapped up like a

burrito with two black and purple swollen eyes looking up at me. All he

could say was, "I'm sorry, Mom."

Your children never intend to cause you any sorrow, but that's the way life is, generation after generation.

We flew over to Redding because Sutter Coast figured he needed a

neurosurgeon. I got to ride as co-pilot and enjoyed the beautiful

scenery, despite the dire circumstances.

Ray, the Cal-Ore pilot, was greatly skilled at avoiding turbulence

and landing us smoothly. The two flight nurses were equally skilled and

professional. Everyone from beginning to end was top notch.

When we landed at Mercy Hospital in Redding, the air was warm and

windy and it felt so good for Daniel to feel the outside air dance

acrosss his face. After four days of MRIs, X-rays and exams, it was

decided he did not need surgery and could go home with a neck and back

brace.

Thanks to my husband driving our Jeep to retrieve us, and his

girlfriend Brandy rendezvousing at 4:30 a.m. from her trip to

Sacramento, we all piled into our Jeep for the five-hour journey back to

Crescent City.

We were surprised to learn his motorcycle insurance that covers

$150,000 in bodily injury only covers other people involved in an

accident, something his agent did not inform him of.

Motorcycle riders: beware. Make sure your insurance covers your own

body, because you will always get hurt the worst between you and a car

or you and a guard rail. He thought he would be protected by the money

paid for insurance.

I don't understand all the politics involved, but if our Sutter Coast

Hospital gets any smaller (there's talk of going down to 25 in-patient

beds), then they will have to fly even more people out of our town for

care.

As my son pointed out, if he had internal bleeding that needed

immediate attention, he would not have survived the two-hour flight to

Redding.

The older we all get the more we need better medical care, not less.

We could lose a great number of the tax-paying population who don't want

to risk living here.

So to close, first, thank you to everyone from Crescent City to

Redding who helped with Daniel's care including his friends. Second, all

motorcycle riders check your insurance coverage. And third, don't

downsize Sutter Coast Hospital.

Velma Rinehart is a Crescent City resident.

14029878
The Del Norte Triplicate
This image is copyrighted.

Crescent City autos, jobs, real estate and merchandise.

Ads appear Online and in Print

View Classifieds

Connect with The Del Norte Triplicate


Triplicate Newsstand

Wednesday August 24, 2016

Read digital interactive editions of our publications

Read Today's Edition Take A Tour
View All Publications