Condo proposal receives local feedback

June 14, 2007 12:00 am
An aerial view shows the A Street site in Crescent City – the health care clinic next to Hampton Inn & Suites – where Development Consultants Inc. proposes constructing a 51-unit condominium building. (Photo Courtesy of Rick Hiser).
An aerial view shows the A Street site in Crescent City – the health care clinic next to Hampton Inn & Suites – where Development Consultants Inc. proposes constructing a 51-unit condominium building. (Photo Courtesy of Rick Hiser).

By Hilary Corrigan

Triplicate staff writer

About 50 people turned out at the Hampton Inn & Suites Tuesday night to hear a developer detail plans for a proposed 51-unit condominium building on A Street.

Randy Baugh, president of El Dorado Hills-based Development Consultants Inc., aims to start construction of the three-floor building in the spring. Along with parking areas, the 78,000 square-foot structure would replace the health clinic and take up about 105,000 square feet of the approximately 1.2-acre site. The clinic now takes up about 9,500 square feet.

The city Planning Commission will hold a public hearing for the project, Coasta Norte, at 5:30 p.m. today in the Cultural Center at 1001 Front St. The project needs a variance for the density that will exceed the lot size. It also requires a development permit for building in the coastal zone.

"It's such a perfect use for that location and this community," said Baugh, who expects construction to take about two years.

Local residents wanted to know about traffic, condo prices, lot size coverage, water drainage and the impact that the structure would have on neighbors' views. They also wanted assurances that the building would not exceed a 35-foot height limit.

Baugh plans to market the $17 million project locally and in Ashland, Ore., as well as along the West Coast and in larger cities such as Seattle, Sacramento and San Francisco. Prices for the one, two and three-bedroom condos could range from $350,000 to $850,000.

"I just think this project is the kind of project Crescent City deserves," Baugh said.

Not all agreed. Local resident and architect Charles Slert objected to the density, lot coverage and lack of local character in the designs.

"It looks like it was manufactured in Orange County and airlifted in," Slert said, noting plans that include a flat roof. "Why would anybody develop a flat roof in a community where it rains 70 inches annually?"

Baugh called on local residents to give ideas.

"Show us what fits in the community," Baugh said.

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