Letters to the Editor December 26, 2008

Written by The Daily Triplicate readers December 26, 2008 08:31 am

Nation’s founders would not see Prop. 8 as abomination

On a recent road trip I stopped through Crescent City and happened to read a letter to the editor in your paper.


In response to  Katherine Kelly’s “Our Founding Fathers would not agree with Prop 8,” Dec. 17, 2008, Kelly seems to assume that our founding fathers would have looked at Proposition 8 as an abomination.


Thomas Jefferson, was quoted in 1814 writing to a neighboring Virginian, “The amalgamation of whites with blacks produces a degradation to which no lover of his country, no lover of excellence in the human character, can innocently consent.”  How can anybody insinuate that Thomas Jefferson would have accepted gay marriage when he felt that interracial marriage was a “Degradation?”


It's unhealthy for our society to assume what our founding fathers would have thought of gay marriage. Unless there’s a documented same-sex marriage during the times of our founding fathers, There’s no proof they would have thought of Proposition 8 as an abomination.


The only abominations I see are being perpetrated by opponents of Proposition 8. There is no excuse for the Gestapo-like tactic of driving fear into anybody who does not support their way of life. Had Proposition 8 failed, and the proponents of the bill would have responded in the same way the opponents are now, those actions would have been viewed by the liberal media as nothing short of hate crimes.


Our founding fathers intended for us to come together and sort our differences out through the democratic act of voting, and 52 percent of the voters in California decided that they are not ready for gay marriage. Those votes should be respected.


 Pedro Baldessi
Portland, Oregon

Homeless on drugs, getting checks hard to feel sorry for

I read the article about the woman who died (“Woman, 47, found dead during frigid weather,” Dec. 16) and the fact that she had an address. Why, if she had a place to stay, was she at the place where she was found?


Then reading of the couple who had been homeless after being kicked out of the woman’s mother’s house (“Homeless in Crescent City,” Dec. 20) makes it hard to feel as sorry for that couple, and  I often wonder if they would have gotten off drugs if the mother would have let them stay. The interviewer reported that both were getting aid and received $850 each!


I guess I am being rude, but I wonder just how many of the homeless are getting checks of the same amount and are still begging. I do not know firsthand how shelters work, but was told that most shelters do not allow people in who are drinking or using drugs when they arrive, which sounds like it would not be a place for some of our homeless. Someone has also suggested to me that they are concerned that there might be people there that are running from the law. I think I recall a few years back when, before a clean up of Elk Creek Park, the police did a warrant sweep and made more than a couple of arrests in the homeless camps for outstanding warrants.


I am glad Our Daily Bread Ministries is there to help. The fact that they provide AA and NA is a great thing and there are probably a lot more people that are sober. The fact that they provide help to the poor is also a great thing, and what I feel worse about is the fact the children did not have that Christmas party.


What I have seen in a small area in Michigan years ago might help spur an idea for next year. Every church in the county along with the Senior Center and the Council on Aging asked for people who could knit and asked them to make at least one pair of mittens and a hat and give one small gift. There were also donations of turkeys and any other trimming that they could think of and they used the community center for a party for the families that had so little. The parents were able to enjoy the meal, but the gifts were for the children.


Brenda Johnston
Crescent City

Blocking access to jetty an unnecessary overreaction

With all due respect to those who suffer the consequences of bad luck or judgment, each incident must not result in total restrictions in a futile attempt to prevent recurrence. Otherwise the entire coastline would be closed, no boats allowed to go out, the Smith River closed to all activities, highways closed, knives, guns and all other possible dangerous objects banned, on and on.  How can anyone be serious about preventing all deaths when school buses have no seatbelts or restraints?  Leave the jetty open with well maintained warning signs. Do not blame anyone else but the risk takers. Anyone driving a car is at far greater risk than jetty walkers. Danger and accidents are inevitable, no matter where, when or to anyone. Good common sense and pure luck protects most of us.


 Bob Douglas
Smith River