Letters to the Editor Aug. 8, 2009

By The Daily Triplicate readers August 08, 2009 12:29 pm

Health care: Do the research. Learn about the issues

This is in response to a recent letter opposing the health care reform legislation now being considered by Congress.

The writer says the legislation mandates that we receive counseling regarding end of life health care decisions.  This is not true.

The proposed law simply allows Medicare recipients, who wish to establish an end of life health care directive, to receive reimbursement for the cost of counseling. It is entirely voluntary.

There is a larger question involved here. Why are people trying to scare us into opposing a law that we very much need?

These people are automatically opposed to government solutions to any of our problems. Since they do not have any ideas of their own as to how to fix our broken health care system, their only remaining tactic is fear. They must try to make us afraid of our own government.

There are certain problems that can only be addressed in a meaningful way by government. Health care reform is one of these.

We should not be afraid of our government. This is a representative democracy. We are the government.  If we do not like what our representatives are doing in Washington, we can vote them out.

Do not listen to these people who are trying to scare you. Do the research. Learn about the issues. Then make your own informed decision.

Sam Allison

               Crescent City


Donations for the Community Gardens are appreciated

I wanted to write in response to the letters written by Richard Miles and Brenda Johnston concerning the Community Gardens. First off, I wanted to thank both Richard and Brenda for your concern about the gardens with respect to the recent vandalism.

The Community Assistance Network’s ambition with the Community Gardens is to provide opportunities for individuals and families to have a place to grow fresh produce, while fostering relationships with their neighbors. The individuals and families that garden at Peterson Park, which is the location where the vandalism occurred, work very hard on maintenance, general upkeep and of course growing in their individual plots. This can be very discouraging to them, not to mention the staff at CAN who work diligently to secure funding through grants, donations from businesses and individuals, all of which provides opportunities these families might not otherwise have.

Donations for the Community Gardens, as well as other programs and services offered through CAN, are both welcome and greatly appreciated. Individuals and businesses can forward their checks to the following address or contact our staff for more details on your giving options: Community Assistance Network, 355 Standard Veneer Road, Crescent City.

Kendra Howerton

Community development coordinator

Community Assistance Network


Some clarification needs to be made on letter on stakeout

Regarding Maggie Calbri’s recent critical letter with respect to the stakeout at Grace Lutheran Church (“Thoughts on stakeout and arrest in church break-in,” Aug. 4), some clarification is appropriate.

Her assumption that we take exception to folks receiving food from us is not so! As Officer Fleshman was quoted in the July 31 stakeout article, the intruder “could have asked any one of these churches for food and they would have helped him.” We wouldn’t even have minded the perpetrator’s eating our pre-school’s corn dogs (or anything else he prepared for himself on two previous nights in our church’s “annex” and pre-school). However, the waste he created, the huge mess he left us along with his careless use of media equipment (vandalism) and taking a pre-schooler’s allergy medication (without which she will die in an allergic reaction) was definitely bad form on his part!

Breaking and entering does still happen to be illegal in Del Norte County, even when you have stolen a key to the premises. Although we reported crimes that happened on our property, there was never any attempt to “attain a police stakeout so our corn dogs would not get stolen.” That was the Sheriff’s Office’s initiative to stop crime at Grace and other churches.

We wonder if Maggie would be upset coming into her house and finding some stranger helping himself to her provisions without her knowledge or permission, or if she would mind discovering this person in her house when she gets up in the morning. We wonder if she’d send her child to a pre-school where there might be some strange intruder there, even if he was only interested in a little food and a place to sleep.

This intruder was not just “homeless,” he was being sought and was evading the police, having had previous violent encounters with them.

We forgive our intruder, and we pray that he will experience whatever it is that will bring him to a commitment to uphold the law and operate “within the system.”

 Pastor David Schlensker

Jane Goss, preschool director

Grace Lutheran Church

Crescent City


Health care legislation has become a joke

Health care legislation has become a joke, but no one is laughing. How can anyone possibly support the bills being introduced by the House and the Senate?

No one can understand or agree on what they contain, how much it will cost us in taxes or jobs, what services it will deny to seniors, children or illegal immigrants, how will fraud prevention be enhanced and will these measures receive appropriate funding to actually prevent fraud. The proof of our ignorance becomes evident when most Americans who support the health care bills try to explain its content with “facts” they have heard in short, non-specific talking points. Our elected representatives (most clinging to their party’s agenda) even agree they don’t understand these bills’ language, cannot articulate answers to questions in simple terms and they require, “two days and two lawyers” to understand the meaning of these bills, let alone understand the impacts to the American people.

I have tried to read through the House bill found online. It is a document that endlessly cross-references previous and following vague language. The House bill offers the reader little insight or a clear understanding as to its content. This allows the meaning of the final bill to be interrupted in endless ways; usually to the detriment of the American people and clueless as to the level of health care they would or would not receive. This is how Washington operates, lots of wiggle-room.

We don’t make a list of options we want in a car and then blindly have it delivered to our homes, with no questions asked. We need to know first if we can afford the price, taxes, the insurance, what the service contract covers and what it does not. The American people do not want to be taken for a ride. We want to know more about what we are buying. The car dealers in Washington just want to sell you something now regardless if it is something you want or need.

Hell, they haven’t even seen the car or know if it works. They just assume it will because it’s new.

I, for one, would not support anything that costs $1 trillion just to replace or augment something we already have. No successful business would do so and then expect to remain in business long.

                   Paul Crandall

Klamath


It’s time politicians start to consider the taxpayers first

The polls say our governor has a low approval rating. What? Who were those that were polled? Everyone I have talked to is very pleased with his budget cuts and most wonder why many of the things cut, should have been initiated in the first place.

I think that if only taxpayers were counted (similar to likely voters in election polls), his ratings would skyrocket!

Let’s look at some of the cuts made. One reduced welfare payments to federal minimums. Why were we paying more? Here is an idea to save even further. Many local businesses require drug tests to maintain employment. Why not require welfare recipients to pass a drug test to continue benefits? The same should apply to public intoxication and DUIs. Why should any politician or do-gooder even think taxpayers should subsidize a drinking problem or drug habit and pay for their rehab?

State employees are required to take three days off a month, 14 percent of payroll. If we can do without them, why not terminate 14 percent of the public employees and save that money and a like amount in overheads (28 percent total)? Maybe then public employees wouldn’t have time on their hands to try to find ways to spend more of our taxpayer money. Bravo for trying to cut back on public employee benefits. Why should public employees have much better pensions and health care than their taxpayer employers?

Don’t tell me that the schools can’t do with less. I will guarantee they will still be able to continue providing the current mediocre education as now.

Taking community development and highway funds hopefully will stop ridiculous projects such as the bicycle bridge across Elk Creek and the provision of bike lanes on Pebble Beach. I agree that the airport terminal should be a little bigger. Instead of a new facility, why not just add a plain, simple, cement block addition to the existing building? If dining facilities are so important, why not franchise a hot dog stand and a couple of vending machines to serve the few tourists flying? The money spent so far on environmental studies, planning, etc., would have paid for it and we would have it now.

It’s time our politicians and public employees, from federal on down to the lowest local board and committee, started considering the taxpayers first instead of vocal, organized minorities such as unions, environmentalists, free health care advocates and homeless supporters.

                                        Jim Wisbauer

Crescent City

                                        Jim Wisbauer

Crescent City