Pages of History: Who stole siren off the police car?

By Nita Phillips February 01, 2013 05:16 pm

From the pages of the Crescent City American, January 1932.

Sometime during the night of Dec. 24, someone borrowed the siren off the police car, and as yet they have failed to return it.

Chief of Police Robinson states that he knows several boys around the city that are capable of playing such a prank, but that he expects them to return the siren within a few days, as it can be of absolutely no use to them. 

Whoever took the siren could not use it themselves, nor could they see it, as they would have a hard time finding a buyer, in the first place, and then the buyer would demand to know how it came into their possession. 

Cupid shirking duties

While 1930 showed a total of 34 marriage licenses issued during the year, five less than the year before, 1931 records only 32 marriages.

This proves that in Del Norte County love-lorn couples are rapidly on the decrease or are going out of the county to escape the five-day waiting period.

Travelers Hotel ad

Banquet lunches 50 cents each — one day notice required.

Del Norte Feed Store ad

Eggs cheaper than meat — one dozen large fresh local eggs sold for 25 cents — guaranteed to weigh over 1½ pounds. 

Store’s scales broken

Some playful bunch of men or boys tipped over the scales that have stood in front of MacKenzie’s five and ten cent store on Christmas Eve, breaking them to such an extent that it will cost around $160 to put them in repair again. 

Neither Mr. MacKenzie nor Chief of Police Robinson have any idea who it could have been that was so possessed with the Christmas spirit of love and charity to have done such a thing.

Investigations are being made, however, and it is not unlikely that some questioning will take place within a few days.

Crow’s dog competes

Redwood, ace coon dog owned by Jack Crow of Ukiah, a resident of Crescent City up until two years ago, was entered in the Pacific coast coon dog championship meet at Ukiah last Sunday. 

A picture of Redwood appeared in the Ukiah Redwood Journal of Dec. 25, describing him as one of the 100 or more valuable coon dogs that would compete in Sunday’s sport. Cash prizes were offered.

Jack Crow, owner of Redwood, resided here a few years before leaving with his wife and small son for Ukiah early in 1930. While here he was engaged in barbering and was also known for his ability as a musician.

Occasionally during his residence here he would sponsor “coon hunts” for sport during the idle winter months and they became quite popular among the dog fanciers.

The latest in watches

A potato watch is the newest thing in watches in Seward’s Jewelry Store. It was found on the Alves Ranch and delivered to the jewelry store by Joe Alves, who was quite impressed by the potato’s inclination to be something else than just an ordinary potato.

This potato is an exact replica of a watch in size and shape and is attracting quite a bit of attention from customers at the store. 

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