Letters to the Editor March 23, 2013

By Del Norte Triplicate Readers March 25, 2013 05:38 pm

During awards, where were other supervisors?

Tuesday evening, the very best of our community were honored at the Cultural Center as the Law Enforcement Administration of Del Norte County honored those who have gone beyond the point of just doing their jobs.

I was in the audience of several hundred as Pelican Bay, the California Highway Patrol, Probation, Search and Rescue, Sheriff’s Office and Crescent City Police Department were shown the community’s appreciation with the presentation of plaques.

I saw Mayor Rich Enea, City Council members Ron Gastineau, Rick Holley and Kathryn Murray, and City Manager Eugene Palazzo.

I noted there was only one representative from the county in attendance: Supervisor Roger Gitlin. Where were the other supervisors? Is this event so unimportant to them, they don’t even bother to show up?

I am embarrassed by the absence of most of the Board of Supervisors. Supervisors Martha McClure, David Finigan, Gerry Hemmingsen and Mike Sullivan, you ought to be ashamed of yourselves.

Randy Christoffersen, Crescent City

Amazed at hypocrisy of local district attorney

Hypocrisy knows no limits. In these last few days before the Bar decides the fate, career-wise, of our local district attorney, I sit in absolute amazement of his hypocritical outlook.

He is charged as the chief law enforcement officer of this county. He is entrusted with a vast amount of authority and with that authority should come judgment, wisdom, compassion and, as one pursues justice vigorously, you should not lose sight as to the meaning of the words, “in the pursuit of justice.”

As a former district attorney I get that we are held and should hold ourselves to a higher standard. I wonder, though, if someone like Jon Alexander was in office when he committed his meth offenses if Jon would now be in prison. He was fortunate, for the person who he dealt with had some sense of right, some sense of the words “pursuing justice.”

I get it, I am being pursued by you. You have the ability to pursue people and I am one of those lucky few. So far I have been charged with six crimes. Prosecutors have taken me to trial and lost. You referred the last offense to the state Attorney General’s Office, it rejected it, you pursued it. Now you are pursuing me yet again for becoming dependent on a medication that I was prescribed, a medication I took after 11 surgeries.

Prosecutors have written questionable subpoenas, if not illegal, for my medical records. They have requested search warrants for my medical files. Yes, after years of taking a prescribed medicine, I became dependent. Yes, thanks to this newspaper, the fact that I put myself through a medical rehab became public. But now you want, in these last few days of your legacy, to prosecute me for dependency upon a legal drug?

My God, where would you be if someone like you decided your fate 15 years ago? Remember, I hired you and gave you that second chance.

You know, as do I, you and you alone pursued the last round of charges as you are orchestrating the new investigation. You pursue filing even after the attorney general and at least one other district attorney advise you not to. Remember the job of the DA is to pursue justice, nothing less, nothing more, simply because pursuing less cheats us all and pursuing more robs us all of equal protection under the law.

Mike Riese, Crescent City

Reasons why local fishermen don't travel

Regarding the March 21 article “Salmon seasons: Sport fishing on ocean promising,” I would like to clarify the statement that local fishermen make most of their money in the crab fishery and that is why they are less likely to travel.

Local fishermen are less likely to travel due to the high costs of living away from home, high fuel costs transiting to other areas, moorage and all the other expenses incurred by living away from home.

I would also like to comment on the fact that we are regulated on the four-year Klamath River stock and California’s projection on 4-year-old fish is 330,000, over three times the river’s average amount. I believe with this increase of fish being available we will get a commercial troll season in our area.

Rick Shepherd, Crescent City