In hard times, it’s vital to buy and sell local

Written by Nita Phillips October 24, 2013 02:25 pm

From the pages of the Crescent City American, October 1931.

In these days of stress, each locality should, for its own preservation, cling more loyally to the cherished idea of keeping its money at home.

Only too often are we solicited by outside factors to donate to some worthy charitable cause, but as worthy as they may be, there is a greater need for charity here at home. If you can give, give locally. And too, if you buy, buy locally. One of these acts is just as important as the other, as they both keep money at home.

The local stores are doing that. They realize that money spent with the local farmer, producer, baker, canner, etc. comes back to them, without a question of doubt.

It is the correct policy. No community can possibly prosper without such local patriotism.

Money spent with mail order houses is gone and cannot return. A local store that does not give its hearty support to local producers is akin to an alien enemy and should be shunned. They have no pride in their community, and their only interest is to glean the few paltry dollars that they do not deserve. 

Getting dolled up

A number of small misses under 12 years of age were made happy at Christmastime last year with beautiful dolls awarded by Endert’s Drug Store to the winners in their first annual doll contest.

Mr. Endert is sponsoring another contest this year, and besides 13 gorgeous doll creations, ranging in value from $1.50 to $19, will be giving away two lovely doll houses. Mr. Endert will be glad to furnish particulars of the contest at the drug store. 

Thieves hit Fort Dick  

Sunday evening persons entered the Johnson estate store at Fort Dick and made away with a small radio, a raincoat and a small quantity of groceries.

The same evening $7.50 was taken from Mark’s nursery between here and Fort Dick and it is believed the same parties performed the two jobs. Sheriff’s officers are investigating. 

Mine may reopen

Water has been removed from the Monumental Mine, located on the old Oregon Mountain road to Crescent City, just across the state line, for the first time since the operations at the mine shut down in 1905. John S. Cowan and E.A. McPherson have an option and lease on the property.

Unwatering of the mine was done through Los Angeles capital, and is preparatory to a sampling of the workings, and engineers are in Grants Pass and at the mine ready to discover whether the ground is good enough for mining to be resumed. Prospects of a start of mining again are based on the belief that there is a big body of low grade ore available.  

McPherson has been a resident of this section for many years and Cowan had experience in the Cripple Creek district. Ten days ought to show whether the property will be worked, it is believed. 

Tinker to see the world

Alfred Tinker, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Tinker, enlisted Oct. 23 in the U.S. Navy at San Francisco. Tinker is a graduate of the class of ’31, Del Norte High School. He is now at the U.S. Naval Training Center in San Diego. 

Reach Nita Phillips at This e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it