Golden Gate Bridge means more visitors

By Nita Phillips November 22, 2013 04:51 pm

From the pages of the Crescent City American, November 1930.

The proposed bridge across the Golden Gate will, in our opinion, be one of the finest improvements that the people of the bridge district could make.

It will mean thousands upon thousands more cars over the Redwood Highway yearly, and tolls will pay for it all as the bonds are merely for the securing of the investment.

All those interested may see a whole window full of pictures of the bridge and how it is to be constructed at the American office. We also have a limited number of beautiful rotogravures for distribution to those who wish them. 

In need of a boost

What Crescent City needs is boosters.

We have all the materials, all the resources, and the natural setting for one of the finest man-made harbors on the Pacific or Atlantic coasts.

Boost your town, tell the world that you are proud that you live in Crescent City, and if you can’t boost Crescent City, don’t knock the town that is furnishing you employment and a home. 

Company remodels

Carpenters are busy this week laying a new floor in the dry goods department of Hobbs, Wall and Co. department store. With the laying of a new floor, rearrangements are being made along with other improvements. 

This comes as part of the program of improvements outlined for the store, the largest of which was the recent complete change made in the arranging of the grocery and hardware departments to give more room. 

Boy builds golf course

The “Lazy Bones” miniature golf course is the latest addition to golf courses in the city, having been opened this week by its small builder and proprietor, Stanley Gould, son of Mrs. J.R. McElfish. 

The course has 12 holes and is located at the lad’s home in the Bray addition. Through many weeks of tireless labor, he has perfected a golf course which would be a credit to a boy twice his age.

He has constructed the course soliciting the help of his playmates in the actual construction, but drew the plans and formed ideas entirely by himself. The novel way in which he has the hazards and all arranged is very clever and he is not a little elated over his accomplishments.

Children may be seen on the course in large numbers in the evenings. 

Fisherman falls into lake

Jim Horn, local nimrod and sportsman, had a harrowing experience on Monday, when he fell into Lake Tolowa and was in the water almost an hour before being rescued by Mervin McLaughlin, who heard his cries for help and went to his assistance.

Mr. Horn, in attempting to pull his boat through the rushes, capsized and became entangled in the duck weed that grows on the bottom of the lake. He managed to hang onto the oversized boat until help arrived. 

Local news in brief

• Mrs. Lottie Hodge and sons Lark and Clark, along with Mrs. Fred Hoar and Miss Jessie Hodge, were Eureka visitors on Wednesday. 

• Mrs. Vera Pook and daughter Janet and son Bill arrived here Sunday from Coquille, Ore., for a couple of days’ visit with Mrs. Pook’s sister, Mrs. John R. Breen and family. They left Tuesday to return to their home in Coquille.

• Van Wilson, pool hall proprietor of this city, and Peggy Mabe, piano player also of this city, secured a marriage license and were married at Gold Beach on Monday, Oct. 13, by Justice Ralf Starr. 

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