Pages of History: The turkey dinner that got away

Written by Nita Phillips January 10, 2014 04:00 pm

From the pages of the Del Norte Triplicate, January 1958.

Candidates for 1957’s “Meanest Man of the Year” aren’t being sought, but here’s one that would probably win hands down.

Expecting guests for Christmas dinner, Mrs. Clara McIndoe of Ocean Drive thoughtfully cleaned and stuffed her turkey on Christmas Eve, then placed it in the refrigerator all ready to pop in the oven the next day.

A good idea, but next morning when she got there, the refrigerator was bare. During the night, someone had entered the house and made away with the bird, dressing and all. Mrs. McIndoe’s guests had fried chicken for Christmas dinner.

Strange-looking money

The 777th ACW Squadron station at Requa hit on a unique way to show Del Norte residents just how much money men stationed at the base spend in this county. If you see a lot of strange bills floating around, don’t figure that someone hit it lucky while playing the ponies.

Yesterday morning at “pay call,” $11,000 of the payroll was distributed in $2 bills!

Freak wind a mystery

Friday morning’s freak wind, which ripped a path of damage through the Beresa tract and other parts of Crescent City, remained somewhat of a mystery today.

While it has been termed a “twister” by most, one insurance adjuster who has investigated similar cases says that he believed the damage was caused by a vacuum which formed at the rear of the unusually strong windstorm and instead of blowing things down as it approached, actually sucked things down as it passed over.

Whatever it was, one thing is certain. No one wants to see it repeat itself anytime soon. 

Small fortune found 

The mystery of where they came from still surrounds last week’s discovery of $5,429.80 in checks found on Front Street by two young Crescent City boys.

According to Police Chief William Burke, one thing is certain. None of the 34 checks, all made out for $159.70, have been passed in Del Norte County.

Not so fortunate was Josephine County, Ore., where so far two checks have turned up. All checks were written against the Columbia River Salmon Company of Astoria, Ore., which according to authorities has been defunct since 1943. 

An Ernest E. Marshall, whose name appeared on all the checks, was located in Empire, Ore., but according to officials knew nothing of the mystery.

Burke said the checks have been sent to Josephine County, where officials there are following up on a lead that may throw some light on the case.

Fish problem studied

Monday’s hearing in Eureka by the Assembly Interim Committee on Fish and Game problems, if nothing else, should have eliminated some of the emotionalism which in the past has characterized the debates over what is happening to the fishing.

Richard S. Croker, chief of the Marine Resources Branch, California Department of Fish and Game, emphasized that no single factor is responsible for the decrease in Chinook salmon runs and this would also apply to trout, steelhead and other fish.

While cuts in limits for both sportsmen and commercial fishermen should help somewhat as an emergency measure, it’s going to take long-range planning and programs designed to correct damage already done and prevent further damage and will need everyone’s cooperation. 

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