Letters to the Editor March 20, 2014

Written by Del Norte Triplicate Readers March 23, 2014 08:33 pm

How School Board treated children was disgraceful

I feel compelled to write this letter after the School Board meeting last night, when KRECR’s school meal request was on the agenda. My daughters feel strongly about this issue. I was filled with pride, as my daughters wanted to stand up for those in need, to be the voice for those who cannot/will not speak up.

My third-grader had a speech with her friend. My first-grader wanted to plead for the poor, hungry kids she sees at school every day. This was their request. We did not parade little kids in front of the board to manipulate them. The way the children were treated makes me believe the Board resented their input.

 

The Board had already decided to put off action and move on when a parent advised there was public comment from three students. You could sense the mental groans and I saw eyes rolling. A parent spoke, clearly rushed and not able to hit all of her points. The students stepped forward to speak. My 8-year-old and her friend read their statement without pause. My 6-year-old stepped forward, opened her mouth, and was cut off abruptly.

The Board moved on without apology. I watched with dread as her eyes filled with tears and she ran, sobbing inconsolably, to her mother’s arms. She repeated, over and over, “They wouldn’t even let me say anything!”

I can honestly say I have never been so angry in my life. I am shaking just remembering it. We left with a sense of how useless the whole process was.

How do I look in her eyes and tell her that the school board does care more about the health and safety of students than they do about administrative hassles? I asked my 6-year-old what she intended to say, and she said that it was “not fair that kids are hungry” and that “a hungry kid is like a mime, who just wants to sing,” and that she “would sell some of her toys to help pay for other kids’ lunches.”

These are the voices we need to hear. So, School Board, mistakes were made. Apologize. Let’s work together to make things better in the future. Let’s rebuild my daughter’s trust in her ability to change the system. We will move on and not hold a grudge as that is what my wife and I would want our daughters to do.

Matthew Long,

Crescent City

Suggestion for a more accurate name for state

I’m familiar with the group, some of the persons, and the politics behind the proposed state of Jefferson.

Rather than maligning one of early America’s foremost advocates of grass-roots democracy and community by calling the new entity the “state of Jefferson,” I suggest it be accurately named the “state of Barbarism.”

Joe Barnwell, 

Crescent City